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  • Bitcoin News - 2 July 2022, 5:30 am

    The latest data from Cryptocompare shows that assets under management (AUM) of crypto investment products reached record lows during the month of June. The data also shows 21 Shares Short Bitcoin ETP as the only digital investment product that registered a positive 30-day return (30.8%) as of June 23. Three Arrows Capital Insolvency Factor The […]Read More

  • Cointelegraph.com News - 2 July 2022, 5:12 am

    The narratives that have propelled crypto to its current status have reached the limits of their influence. It’s time to rethink how to pitch crypto to a broader society. A new financial system; a more democratized, even more inclusive, financial sector; the future of the internet — the crypto ecosystem has been described as all of these things. However, as is evidenced by digital assets’ inherent correlation with the Nasdaq 100, most people fail to conceptualize blockchain as anything other than an extension of the traditional tech economy. While blockchain’s proponents laud its virtues and potential, they have been unable to make a comprehensive case for blockchain to everyday people.Many crypto natives anticipate “the decoupling,” in which digital assets become financially independent from traditional tech equities. But without a clear plan of action for how to differentiate decentralized crypto technology, industry independence will be unrealized. Those of us who believe in the long-term promise of blockchain technology need to completely rethink how to pitch blockchain to broader society.Related: A new intro to Bitcoin: The 9-minute read that could change your lifeWhat is “the decoupling”?The Bitcoin (BTC) whitepaper — published 14 years ago — demonstrated, at its core, the ambition to build a world of permissionless, decentralized payments. To date, this goal has been partially advanced with developments like El Salvador’s national Bitcoin adoption.However, the cryptocurrency ecosystem hasn’t supplanted traditional finance. In fact, it has ingrained itself into it. Turn on CNBC and you will hear about the latest legacy institution entering the crypto space, and you will see minute-by-minute graphs of crypto price action alongside models of traditional equity markets. You likely won’t hear any blockchain commentator or industry leader speaking about improving financial transactions, eliminating third-party banking institutions, or any other defining element of the original crypto ethos.The result of this broad change in purpose and perception is that crypto — despite being established to lessen dependence on traditional finance — grows and declines with the movements and behaviors of the traditional economy. Evidently, the Fed’s meeting memos and Amazon’s quarterly earnings calls have, at present, a far greater sway on the crypto ecosystem than anything laid out in Satoshi Nakamoto’s whitepaper.If cryptocurrency cannot be financially independent from the legacy financial and technical industry it seeks to replace, what is the purpose of cryptocurrency? Decoupling is not an industry luxury — it is a necessary step for the industry’s survival. Related: The meaningful shift from Bitcoin maximalism to Bitcoin realismHow does crypto decouple?The broader community must acknowledge two things. First, you cannot wish your way into a new financial reality; the decoupling won’t happen just because we want it to. Second, it’s said that insanity is doing the same thing over and over again while expecting different results. The narratives that have built crypto to its current status reached the limits of their influence; continued adherence to the same strategy will just perpetuate stagnation.To fully decouple, I propose three broad steps: We, in the crypto-community, make blockchain technology and…Read More

  • Cointelegraph.com News - 2 July 2022, 2:41 am

    How to identify top crypto talent in the recruitment process: Hire a diverse range of people who have the required attributes without lowering your standards. Building a career or constructing a team in decentralized finance (DeFi) and crypto relies on finding talent, skills and the right attitude anywhere, in anyone. While this is no different than other industries, what makes ours unique are the much-needed, specialized skill sets combined with finding a good culture fit in an international and remote setting.Despite recent turbulence in markets, crypto companies continue building and growing. The increased energy and legitimacy in the industry over the years has many people wanting to make the switch from Web2 to Web3. This requires recruiters to sift through hundreds of applicants every month, but how do you find the right people who are enthusiastic about the ethos of the industry and excited to build impactful technology? Here are a few recruiting strategies that can help and a couple of things to avoid.Hire for attitudeNo matter the industry, the right attitude can go a long way. Work in crypto and DeFi is often international, remote, fast-moving and non-traditional. Its nature is decentralized, so work environments tend to be the same.We lean into hiring people who are kind, team-oriented, self-directed, energetic, innovative and deal with mistakes and challenges in the right way. But how do you identify those habits and the right attitude in someone during the hiring process?There are a few ways to do this. Ask them what they value. What do they find important in terms of culture, teamwork and others’ attitudes?To drive at these responses, it can help to ask the candidate the same question in a few different ways and then measure for sincerity. If they keep coming back to topics or statements that feel genuine, then they probably are. If they haven’t thought of what values and cultural elements they look for in their next team, that could be a red flag.It is also helpful to dig into how candidates plan to succeed in a remote and international setting. (Our team has people in nearly a dozen different countries around the world.) How have they managed with diverse time zones? What is their attitude around being flexible for other teammates’ work/life boundaries? We’ve learned that successful remote work requires people with attitudes that embrace flexibility and understand how to self-direct with asynchronous communication.Related: How to get a job in the metaverse and Web3Maintain a deeply thorough interview processWe’ve been told many times that our interview process is one of the most deliberate and in-depth recruiting processes candidates have experienced. It’s common for a candidate to speak to up to four current members of the team during the interview process. It’s not meant to be grueling; it’s meant to be explorative, transparent and helpful — to both sides.This process is by design. Several conversations, practice scenarios, exercises and touchpoints that involve several current team members create more opportunities to get to know each other. The more…Read More

  • Bitcoin News - 2 July 2022, 2:30 am

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has charged Mirror Trading International (MTI) and its operator with a $1.7 billion fraud involving bitcoin. This action is the regulator’s largest fraud scheme case involving the cryptocurrency. CFTC Takes Action Against MTI The CFTC announced Thursday that it has charged a “South African pool operator and CEO […]Read More

  • Bitcoin News - 1 July 2022, 11:30 pm

    Coincoinx, a cryptocurrency exchange, will reportedly launch a service that will allow users to skip trading crypto for fiat to make payments in Venezuela. The service, which is called Coinpago, will allow users to make payments in every store and retailer in the country that accepts Pagomovil, a banking service that allows seamless fiat transfers […]Read More

  • Cointelegraph.com News - 1 July 2022, 10:29 pm

    Monstercat CEO Mike Darlington and Metalink founder Jake Udell chat with NFT Steez about the future of Web3 and music NFTs. According to Mike Darlington, the CEO of Monstercat, an electronic music platform, and Jake Udell, the founder of social NFT platform Metalink, bear markets are a time to ideate and build new products. During this week’s episode of NFT Steez, a bi-weekly Twitter Space hosted by Cointelegraph analysts, both Darlington and Udell agreed that the future will be bright for crypto and especially for music NFTs. During the interview, Darlington and Udell explained the importance of researching projects with “sustainable teams” that continue to build despite the current market conditions and they encouraged investors to learn from the possibilities created at the height of the bull market. According to Darlington, music NFTs haven’t necessarily had made it as a “trend” yet, but he is hoping that they cement their space in the next bull cycle. Comparatively, profile pictures (PFP) NFTs are a “monster of their own,” but music NFTs can see similar success to that of photography or art NFTs.Creators and communities will benefit from music NFTsFor creators looking into experimenting with music NFTs, Darlington suggested that it is first important to discover and understand “why do you want to interact and why do you want to get involved?” Darlington said some creators have come to “recognize how broken the music industry is for artists” and music NFTs present a possibility that can provide more sustainability for artists and musicians. While it’s uncertain how sustainable the new landscape will be for artists, the one “resounding truth” and commonality is that creators are not “content with the current model,” there is a willingness to be open to change the status quo but this depends on the “format and the shape that music NFTs will arrive in,” explains Darlington. Are music NFTs in a separate genre of their own?Metalink founder, Jake Udell alluded to how levels of engagement differ between free and pay-to-use platforms with users opting to engage more in platforms they have a stake in. Creators and users who feel they have invested into the product are more likely to “play around with the product more and be more likely to make something of it,” says Udell. Interestingly, this dichotomy where users are invested and in-turn empowered to experiment opens up for a more dynamic relationship between the listener and the artist instead of listening to music as a “passive” pastime. Whether or not users care about ownership or truly have it matters less in relation to the culture and community created toward the increased value entities are now placing on digital goods. According to Udell, the amount of attention the NFT space received in the last year alone led the way for a “cult like phenomenon.” Groups are brought together by the common thread of Web3 and while Udell does not believe that “Web3 is necessarily a genre,“ it is another avenue for artists to tap into and successfully grow…Read More

  • Cointelegraph.com News - 1 July 2022, 9:30 pm

    Coinbase, Three Arrows Capital and MicroStrategy headline the latest business news from the world of blockchain. Coinbase has long been considered an important bellwether of the cryptocurrency market. Last year, when the company was expanding its workforce, adding institutional clients and issuing stock, crypto prices were hitting record highs. Now, in the depths of crypto winter, Coinbase finds itself slashing a fifth of its workforce, losing retail trading volume and contending with downgrades of its credit and stock.This week’s Crypto Biz dissects Goldman Sachs’ latest downgrade of Coinbase and also looks at the latest developments surrounding Three Arrows Capital. Goldman Sachs downgrades Coinbase stock to ‘sell’After a promising debut on the Nasdaq stock exchange in April 2021, it has been nothing but down for Coinbase shares. The company, which once had a fully diluted market capitalization of nearly $100 billion, has been caught in a downward spiral amid crypto winter. Recognizing the 80% decline in Coinbase stock, analysts at Goldman Sachs this week downgraded the company to “sell,” which is basically a recommendation that investors liquidate their positions and be done with the stock for now. Goldman isn’t the only firm turning bearish on Coinbase. Earlier this month, credit rating agency Moody’s downgraded the company to a Ba3 rating, which is considered a non-investment grade. 21Shares responds to bear market with crypto winter ETPSwiss asset manager 21Shares is gearing up for crypto winter by launching a new product that allows investors to gain low-cost exposure to Bitcoin (BTC). Earlier this week, the company introduced its 21Shares Bitcoin Core exchange-traded product, also known as CBTC. What makes CBTC so unique is its paltry expense ratio of just 21 basis points, which is 44 basis points below the next cheapest product on the market. Basically, 21Shares wants you to keep stacking sats — or buying shares in its ETP — during the market downturn. Unless you think Bitcoin is dead, the best time to accumulate is during bear markets. British Virgin Islands court reportedly orders to liquidate 3ACThe brain trust behind Three Arrows Capital, also known as 3AC, has been radio silent over the past few weeks amid reports that the hedge fund is bankrupt. On June 27, a court in the British Virgin Islands ordered that 3AC be liquidated, setting the stage for further volatility in the cryptocurrency market. Although details were sparse, the liquidation ruling came shortly after the crypto exchange Voyager Digital handed 3AC a notice of default for its failure to pay back a massive loan that included 15,250 BTC and 350 million USD Coin (USDC). Buckle up, ladies and gents, the next few months are going to be ugly. MicroStrategy scoops up 480 Bitcoin amid market slumpConcerns about Michael Saylor’s conviction on Bitcoin were laid to rest this week after the MicroStrategy CEO announced that his company had acquired an additional 480 BTC for $10 million. MicroStrategy is now sitting on a colossal 129,699 BTC valued at a combined $3.98 billion. Given its average purchase price of…Read More

  • Cointelegraph.com News - 1 July 2022, 9:00 pm

    A new staking mechanism through RADAR token has been created that is set to minimize gas fees and support recurring APR across multiple blockchains. DappRadar and omnichain interoperability protocol LayerZero have launched a new token to enable cross-chain staking across multiple blockchains and Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM)-compatible networks — a move designed to minimize fees and increase access to staking opportunities.The functionality for the newly launched RADAR token is provided through a set of smart contracts, DappRadar said. One of the contracts is known as the controller and the other as a proxy. The two smart contracts work together to enable the new staking mechanism.Requests made to withdraw or claim rewards are sent to the proxy smart contract. It communicates with the controller contract to determine if the request is valid. If the request is valid, the controller informs the proxy to release the tokens. DappRadar claims this type of cross-chain staking was previously unavailable anywhere.DappRadar also provided documentation instructing users on how to take advantage of this new functionality. The instructions mention that users can “can stake [their] RADAR tokens on the Ethereum blockchain and then claim the rewards on BNB Chain.” These two chains are the first supported, with a rollout for Polygon (MATIC) expected soon.DappRadar describes itself as a decentralized application exploration platform. The RADAR overview mentions that the token will help the company broaden its coverage, pursue faster listings for emerging projects, provide more accurate listings of current projects and offer better portfolio tools. Related: GameFi continues to grow despite crypto winter: DappRadar reportDappRadar and LayerZero first announced their RADAR token in December 2021. Seven months later, the crypto market landscape has changed dramatically, with June capping off the worst quarter in 11 years. Despite the current bear market, other tokens have seen new highs up to 300%.Read More

  • Bitcoin News - 1 July 2022, 9:00 pm

    After the TSX-listed Voyager Digital revealed that it was owed $655 million from Three Arrows Capital (3AC), the company secured a $500 million credit line from Alameda Ventures in order to “safeguard customer assets.” Five days later on July 1, Voyager announced the crypto company was “temporarily suspending trading, deposits, withdrawals and loyalty rewards.” Another […]Read More

  • Bitcoin News - 1 July 2022, 7:30 pm

    Last week the Russian ruble hit a seven-year high against the U.S. dollar and while analysts have downplayed the rise, one economist said people should not “ignore the exchange rate.” American economists have been perplexed about the ruble’s market performance and Russian officials have been quoted as saying that a strong ruble “makes Russian exports […]Read More

Frequently Asked Questions

Market capitalization is one of the most popular metrics in finance. It was first introduced in the stock market and has been adapted to the crypto world where it is used to value cryptocurrencies.

Crypto market cap has its supporters and its critics. Supporters view market cap as a simple, albeit incomplete way to rank cryptoasset projects. Critics insist that market cap is not a measure of value but a crude expression of the price investors are willing to pay. Both sides make valid points.

Crypto market cap is calculated by multiplying the circulating supply of a coin by its current price. For example, if a digital currency has 1,000 tokens in circulation, and each token trades at $100, the market capitalization of the project is $100,000.

As with stocks, cryptocurrencies are classified in terms of market cap. Large-cap cryptocurrencies have market caps in excess of $10 billion, mid-cap cryptocurrencies range between $1 billion and $10 billion, and small-cap cryptocurrencies are worth less than $1 billion. In the world of stocks, the higher the market cap, the safer the investment. In the world of cryptocurrencies, a high market cap is less meaningful.

If the market cap of a cryptoasset is high, it means that it trades at a high price, has a high circulating supply, or both. If the market cap is low, it signals that the price per coin is low, there is little circulation, or both. This is all that market cap can reveal about a cryptocurrency. Nothing more. It can’t express whether tokens are held by a network of small investors or a handful of whales, it doesn’t speak to liquidity, and it is silent on max supply.

Crypto market cap is a source of controversy. There are those who claim that market cap reflects the amount of fiat currency invested in a cryptoasset. This is wrong. Consider an influx of new investors to a project with low trading volume. Due to the market’s lack of depth, the sudden interest dramatically drives up prices. Let’s say that the token goes up 50%, from a million-dollar market cap to $1.5 million. Does that mean that the investors pumped in $500,000? Absolutely not. The new market cap merely reflects the price that the last investor was willing to pay.

Another example: take a new cryptocurrency with a circulating supply of 100,000. It goes live, and the first investor buys a token for $5. Once that trade is executed, the project will have a market capitalization of $500,000. Yet only \$5 changed hands.

All that said, when considered with other indicators, crypto market cap can be useful. It’s quite common to look at market cap alongside metrics like trading volume and liquidity. Trading volume refers to the number of coins being traded across the world’s cryptocurrency exchanges. Liquidity measures the degree to which an asset can be bought or sold without causing a major price change. In most cases, high volume and high liquidity mean a healthy market that is difficult to manipulate. Indeed, a classic way to measure the quality of a cryptocurrency is to check whether its trading volume is equal to or greater than its market cap.

Crypto market cap has major drawbacks, yet it remains the go-to indicator for many investors, analysts, and commentators. This is unfortunate. At best, market cap can serve as a jumping-off point for evaluating a cryptocurrency. But it is only truly helpful when used in tandem with other metrics like trading volume.

Although market cap is, at best, an incomplete indicator of cryptoasset quality in some cases, it can be a useful starting point for analyzing an investment opportunity.

Market cap reveals a bit about a coin’s characteristics. For example, high market cap could indicate that a cryptocurrency is resistant to volatility. Low market cap indicates the opposite, that major news events or whale activity can significantly impact price. However, crypto market cap can only take you so far. To get a strong read on volatility, you’d have to combine market cap with other metrics like market depth or transaction volume.

Traditionally, stocks are analyzed with metrics such as price-to-earnings (P/E) and earnings-per-share (EPS). Crypto projects don’t publish financial statements, but there is still a need for comparison. Over time, the simplicity of market cap has made it the most popular way to compare cryptoassets. For this reason alone, crypto market cap matters. It’s important because crypto investors, exchanges, aggregators, and project owners think it’s important.

Experienced investors will usually consider multiple indicators, but there are some who base their decisions exclusively on market cap. Crypto exchangesuse market cap as a way to determine which coins to list – coins with higher caps are more likely to make it. Exchange data aggregators tend to rank projects by market cap. The higher an asset’s market cap, the more prominently it will be featured on the site. Project owners take market cap seriously enough to spend time and money manipulating the circulating supply or price of their tokens. This is just one reason why crypto market cap is considered a misleading or unreliable indicator.

To summarize, crypto market cap matters because it’s easy to understand and a decent starting point for analyzing a cryptoasset. It’s also important because so many players consider it to be important. As the crypto space matures, better tools will be developed that will provide market participants with in-depth, actionable information. When that happens, market cap will likely lose its place as the leading crypto indicator.

As of this writing, the global crypto market cap all-time high is $813.9 billion ($813,871,000,000 USD). The market reached this level on January 7, 2018.

Crypto market cap is calculated the same way as stock market cap, by multiplying the circulating supply of an asset by its price in fiat currency (e.g. USD, EUR, JPY). The calculation gets trickier when an asset is traded against another asset. In a crypto pair – let’s say Ethereum/Bitcoin or ETH,BTC – to get the price of ETH, we would first denominate BTC in fiat.

In order to understand market cap, it’s important to consider its constituent parts – price and circulating supply. Price depends on who makes the calculation. The general price is calculated as a composite of spot prices used on crypto exchanges. For index funds, which have recently become popular, the calculation is adjusted to include variation in trading pair prices. The price that you see on online news aggregators (Google, for example) is usually the average price at which an asset trades on leading exchanges.

In the crypto space, the problem of inadequate pricing is well-known. Most pricing index issuers fail to detail how they price instruments or where they get their data. At Dappride, we strive to set this right. Our methodology takes the price at which an instrument last traded on each exchange, weighted by the general trading volume over the past 24 hours. More on our methodologyhere.

When it comes to supply, it is worth noting that the calculation depends entirely on the token and the mechanics of its protocol. Although Bitcoin has a finite supply (21 million), most tokens are designed with a dynamic supply that increases over time. When calculating the market cap of a particular cryptoasset, it is the circulating supply that should be taken into account. Circulating supply is the number of tokens that are currently available on the market. Circulating supply is a better metric than total supply because it excludes coins that are reserved or locked.

Bitcoin BTC is the world’s leading cryptocurrency by market cap. In terms of market cap, Bitcoin has reached heights of over $300 billion. Most of the time, Bitcoin’s market cap accounts for 30% to 60% of the entire cryptocurrency market cap. To find Bitcoin’s market cap, locate the value in the “market cap” column associated with the Bitcoin record in the table above.

As with other cryptoassets, Bitcoin’s market cap is determined by multiplying its circulating supply by its current price. It is worth noting that, due to the finite supply of Bitcoin, at some point, circulating supply and total supply will be equal. At that time, Bitcoin’s market cap will have only one dynamic determinant, the price.

Bitcoin’s current circulating supply has already reached 85% of the maximum supply, which is fixed at 21 million.

Some investors view low market cap as synonymous with high profit potential. Similar to penny stocks (stocks priced below \$1), low-cap cryptocurrencies are often considered to be undervalued. That is why many market participants favor cryptocurrencies with low market caps. They believe these currencies have more room for price appreciation. Others view low market cap cryptocurrencies as ground-floor opportunities.

Whatever the reasoning, low market cap cryptocurrencies are popular investments. Here’s how to find low market cap cryptocurrencies on the Dappride platform:

  1. Navigate to Dappride
  2. Sort cryptocurrencies by market cap.
  3. Move beyond page 1 to explore low market cap cryptocurrencies.

Dappride lists cryptocurrencies with market caps as low as a few thousand dollars. However, you should avoid choosing an investment by market cap alone. Consider additional factors such as recent price changes, trading volume, circulating supply, and transparent volume, a feature unique to Dappride that shows the percentage of trading volume that occurs on reputable cryptocurrency exchanges.

Market capitalization is often used to indicate the value of a company or stock. It is calculated by multiplying the total number of shares outstanding by the price per share. Investors calculate the value of a cryptocurrency by multiplying its circulating supply by its current price. Though stock and crypto investors use the same indicator, the calculation differs in some respects.

Stock market cap calculation

To calculate the market cap of a company, multiply shares outstanding by the current price per share. Let’s take a minute to examine both components of the equation.

Shares outstanding reflects all stocks that are currently held by shareholders. It even includes restricted shares (held by corporate staff) and share blocks (held by institutional investors).

Price, on the other hand, is affected by internal factors such as profit, expected profit, and plans for growth. How investors perceive these factors influences supply and demand and determines the price of a stock.

Crypto market cap calculation

To find the market cap of a cryptocurrency, multiply circulating supply by current price. Circulating supply is similar to shares outstanding but only includes tokens that are available in the market. It excludes coins that are reserved or locked.

The price of a cryptocurrency is usually calculated as an average of the spot price at which the instrument trades on leading exchanges. Cryptocurrency pricing in the context of index funds happens in a slightly more sophisticated way and is adjusted to include variation in trading pair prices.

The differences

Although market cap is used to value both companies and cryptocurrencies, there are differences in the way it is applied.

For instance, shares outstanding takes into account all issued shares, including those held by corporate officers and big investors. Circulating supply ignores reserved or locked coins. As a result, crypto market cap only includes assets that are available for trading. If crypto market cap followed the same logic as stock market cap, it would be based on total supply. A far more accurate calculation is achieved by using circulating supply. For more on the cons of using total supply, see the next question below.

Another difference is pricing mechanics. While most stocks have fixed issuance mechanisms, in the case of cryptocurrencies, many protocols are designed to expand continuously, thus inflating token supply over time.

In general, crypto market cap isn’t considered to be as accurate as stock market cap. One of the reasons is that, unlike the stock market, where a high market cap indicates a safe investment, in the world of cryptocurrencies, high market cap doesn’t necessarily mean that an investment is secure. Another reason is the fact that cryptocurrency comes with certain risks that don’t exist with stocks. To compensate, one must analyze market cap in a broader context.

The oldest “modern” securities market in the world is the Amsterdam Stock Exchange, which was founded in 1602 by the Dutch East India Company. The first cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, was launched in 2009. This goes to show how young the cryptocurrency market is compared to the stock market, which has had centuries to mature. We often make the mistake of copying stock market metrics and trying to shoehorn them into the world of cryptocurrencies. So is the case with market capitalization.

Market cap is applied to both stocks and cryptocurrencies, but there are differences in how the metric works in each case. In the world of stocks, market cap can reveal much about a company including corporate policies (for example, the issuance or repurchase of shares), management style, and operational scale. It is often used for its simplicity and relative effectiveness at assessing the quality of a stock.

When it comes to cryptocurrencies, however, market cap is not a useful basis for making an investment decision. In fact, many researchers describe crypto market cap as a deceiving indicator that is used only because it is simple.

Despite all that, market cap continues to be used as a leading indicator of cryptoasset quality – even by experienced investors. This is a mistake.

The pitfalls of crypto market cap

Stocks and tokens have very different characteristics. Stocks represent ownership of a company that creates economic and social value. Depending on the type of stock, ownership can provide a shareholder with the right to receive dividends, vote, and participate in procedures aimed at raising liquidity. Tokens represent participation in a network that may or may not generate value. Tokens do not guarantee claims on profits or participation in sales or ICOs. A token’s price is based not on real-world factors that influence supply and demand but on speculation about a project’s potential.

The truth is, while digital tokens are an exciting asset class, they are fundamentally different than stocks, and using the same indicator to analyze them can result in false or unrepresentative conclusions.

Another problem with crypto market cap is token inflation. With stocks, the total supply is fixed and can rarely be changed. The only way to change it is via a stock split. When it comes to tokens, however, an emission schedule can guarantee an instrument’s continual inflation. The increase in circulating supply that takes place over time leads to a higher market cap. But a higher market cap doesn’t necessarily mean that a project is doing well. It could just mean that there are more tokens in circulation. And vice-versa – a lower market cap doesn’t necessarily mean that a project is struggling. It may simply indicate that there are fewer tokens in circulation.

Crypto market cap was initially copied from the stock market. Although one of the factors, price, is present in both cases, there was a need to find a crypto metric that replicated the role of shares outstanding. The option that most resembled shares outstanding was total supply – all coins or tokens that currently exist and are either in circulation or locked. But this opened a loophole. Token owners could artificially inflate their market cap by pre-mining coins and locking them away. In response, total supply was swapped for circulating supply – all coins or tokens that are available for trading, excluding those that are reserved or locked. Circulating supply was intended to measure liquid supply. This raised new complications, namely how to define which part of supply could be considered liquid. Take lost coins, for example. Circulating supply is incapable of judging which coins are lost forever. Many critics of circulating supply suggest that the metric tends to overestimate the real supply on the market by including tokens that aren’t actually available.

Perhaps the most notable pitfall of the crypto market cap calculation is found in the mechanics of the cryptocurrency market. As the crypto market tends to be more volatile than the stock market, any significant buy or sell order can lead to a major price movement that will affect a project’s market cap. This is why we often use a metric known as redemption impact score which measures the likelihood of a large order affecting the price of a cryptoasset. A high redemption impact score indicates a less stable price while a low score indicates that an asset can maintain a relatively stable price through dynamic market activity. In reality, the majority of cryptocurrencies have high redemption impact scores.

This demonstrates how easily market cap can be manipulated when a coin has meager trading volume. The same occurs when a whale, or large investor holding a significant percentage of a cryptocurrency, decides to dump it all at once. The cryptocurrency’s price plummets, followed by its market cap.

Another way to illustrate how inefficient and even deceiving market cap can be is to imagine that you are launching a cryptocurrency project. Let’s say that the project has a total token supply of one billion. If you sell a single coin for $1, your project is now worth $1 billion.

Yet another downside to crypto market cap is its inability to measure the value of a project. Crypto market cap merely reveals the price that investors are willing to pay. It does not express value. Consider overnight price gains. If Tron TRX suddenly jumps 20%, does that mean the network has added new features or created real-world value in any way? Most of the time, the answer is no. Generally, it just means that people are willing to pay 20% more for the asset.

One last thing to bear in mind is that market cap is a reflection of the last price at which a cryptoasset traded. All previous trades were executed at different prices, and there is no guarantee that the last price will be the price at which the next trade executes. In fact, given the volatility of cryptocurrencies, price is unlikely to remain the same for very long.

Crypto market cap alternatives

Several alternatives have proven to be better indicators of cryptoasset quality.

The first is market cap’s upgraded version – fully diluted market cap (FDMC), which optimizes circulating supply by normalizing disparities in emission schedules. FDMC bases market cap calculations on a point in the future when an asset’s supply is comparable to the current supply. This normalizes emission schedules between assets to provide a more even comparison. However, FDMC has its flaws. The main one is its inability to deal with protocols designed to inflate supply in perpetuity. This means that no matter how distant the point in time, results may still be skewed. Another pitfall of FDMC is its assumption that prices will remain constant regardless of changes in supply.

Realized cap is another market cap alternative. It improves on circulating supply by excluding coins that have been lost or never activated. The indicator relies on unspent transaction output (UTXO), which is used by nodes to confirm the validity of transactions: if a transaction isn’t present in the database, it isn’t considered valid. UTXO helps avoid the problem of double-spending, or the spending of nonexistent coins. The only downside to realized cap is that it struggles to differentiate coins that are lost entirely from coins that are HODLed for the long haul.

This leads us to one of the most popular alternatives to market cap, market-value-to-realized-value (MVRV), which seeks to determine how over- or undervalued a particular asset is by analyzing where it is in its market cycle. MVRV is calculated by dividing market cap by realized cap. The concept is that market cap reveals market hype while realized cap indicates whether long-term, “serious” investors have entered the market. The addition of market cycle analysis enhances market cap and makes it more dynamic.

However, it is worth noting that crypto market cap, or any of its alternatives, represent a single way to evaluate the quality of a cryptoasset. There are other indicators that provide statistical data about the performance of cryptoassets and characteristics that might be detrimental to their long-term health.

To fully understand them, we must first look at the stock market. To find the real value of a stock, analysts calculate the net present value of a company’s projected revenues or dividends. Stock market analysts rely heavily on relative valuation models like price-to-earnings (P/E), which allows them to perform a fair comparison of two instruments. Cryptocurrency analysts have attempted to adapt this framework into metrics such as network-value-to-Metcalfe (NVM) and network-value-to-transactions (NVT).

Before delving into NVM, let’s define Metcalfe’s Law. The law is usually applied to online networks, but it is also considered useful in the world of cryptocurrencies. According to the law, the more people who use a network, the more utility each person derives. This also leads to a higher network value. Cryptocurrency analysts use NVM to determine how over- or undervalued an asset may be.

The next ratio, NVT, focuses on transaction volume. The ratio is similar to P/E in the stock market, where earnings act as a proxy for the value that each shareholder receives. In place of earnings, NVT substitutes network transactions and divides market cap by daily transaction volume. High NVT indicates that an asset’s market value surpasses its actual value. Low NVT indicates an undervalued network. NVT isn’t a flawless indicator. It’s not clear on which transactions should be considered, and the fact that there are on- and off-chain transactions increases the difficulty of estimating total transaction volume.

Another way to determine the liquidity of an asset is through buy support, which is the sum of buy orders at 10% distance from the highest bid price. Buy support helps explain how liquid a particular asset is and how many buy orders should be expected.

In addition to factors like price, circulating supply, liquidity, and trading volume, a network’s value can also be considered in terms of security, number of active contributors, and popularity on social media and Telegram.

Hopefully, this demonstrates that crypto market cap is an incomplete metric and that investors who rely on it exclusively do so at their peril. Although market cap is the most popular indicator of cryptoasset value, it is inefficient at estimating asset quality and struggles to provide actionable data. For these reasons, crypto market cap should always be backed by additional market metrics.

There are two ways to raise the market cap of a crypto project. Think of them as the “artificial” way and the “natural” way. Or, in other words – the “bad” way and the “good” way. The “bad” way exists because market cap is an inefficient indicator and prone to manipulation. We’re going to focus on positive (or “natural”) ways to raise a project’s market cap.

We have already examined the drawbacks of market cap. To summarize, it presents investors with a price rather than a value. While a higher price doesn’t necessarily indicate a higher value, a higher real-world value can increase the price of a token. This means that if you want to raise the price of a cryptocurrency, focus on increasing the value of the network. The first step is to attract as many active users as possible. The bigger the network, the more stable and attractive it is. Vitalik Buterin, the founder of Ethereum (ETH), listed several characteristics that increase the value of a network:

  1. SecurityLarger networks require consensus from more nodes, which means more resilience against hackers.
  2. Usability – Merchant adoption means better usability and more convenience for consumers. And vice versa. The more consumers that use a particular network, the more attractive it is to merchants.
  3. Integration – Platforms with more users are also more attractive to third-party service or product providers. The more integrations a network has, the more functional it is.
  4. Market depth – Bigger networks usually have greater trading depth on exchanges, allowing users to convert larger quantities of a cryptocurrency without significantly affecting its price.
  5. Reasonable fees – Users prefer cryptocurrencies with no or low fees. The more users a cryptocurrency has, the more counterparties there are, which naturally drives down transaction fees.

But how does a network reach a point where it attracts new users on a regular basis? Before a network attracts users continuously and naturally, it must meet certain prerequisites. Let’s take a look.

Real-world use cases

For a coin to be valuable, it must have a strong use case. A protocol must solve a real-world problem. It could tackle a market pain point or provide value to investors in the form of utility rights or as a medium of exchange on a platform. When a coin has a proven use case, there is an incentive for investors to buy, hold, or spend it. Consider Ethereum. For someone to develop applications on the network, he or she needs gas, which comes from the platform’s currency, ETH. The more developers there are, the bigger the demand for ETH, and the higher its price goes. The result: a higher network value and a higher market cap.

The aim of each cryptocurrency is mass adoption. That said, having real-world applications remains a difficult task for most crypto projects. It is a long and complicated journey, but it is the right path to follow. _ _ A coin that isn’t designed with a use case in mind is merely a tool for speculators, without any fundamental value.

Scarcity

In some cases, scarcity can result in increased value. The more rare an asset, the more expensive it becomes. This is certainly the case with Bitcoin (BTC). Its fixed supply means that its protocol cannot continuously issue new tokens, and many experts believe that the closer we get to the moment when all coins are mined, the higher the price will rise. This principle is valid mostly for coins with real-world use cases.

A large number of coins are designed with continuously expanding protocols. Although this leads to a higher market cap, it doesn’t really add value.

Meanwhile, other projects have an integrated “burning” mechanism to destroy a portion of their supply and increase the price of each coin. Scarcity is a useful tool for project owners who wish to control the market cap of their tokens, but it should be used appropriately.

Listings on exchanges

Another way to boost market cap is to get listed on as many reputable crypto exchanges as possible. However, getting listed on exchanges cannot be the final goal. Many have policies to delist tokens that aren’t regularly traded. Therefore, it’s vital for projects to wait until they’ve gained some popularity and built an initial user base.

Projects that are listed on leading exchanges are usually considered more reputable and find it easier to attract investors. This then leads to higher liquidity, which, combined with a higher market cap, can turn a cryptoasset into a preferred investment opportunity.

For more information on how to get listed on an exchange and remain successful afterward, check our Cryptocurrency Exchanges FAQ.

A clear roadmap

Projects that hit roadmap milestones on time have a higher perceived value. A project’s openness to innovation and partnerships with proven third-party service providers can also raise credibility in the eyes of investors. Backing from well-known companies means more transparency and a more natural path for projects to establish themselves on the market.

Loyal followers

Projects that have a stable or increasing base of followers are more attractive to investors: the higher the number of active contributors, the more progressive a network will become. Think of it like the snowball effect – the more people there are on a network, the more will be interested in joining.

One way to gauge a network’s number of users is its node count. Node count reveals how many active wallets exist on a network. The higher the number, the stronger the network is. This is why many investors use a market cap/node count ratio to determine whether a cryptocurrency is under- or overbought.

However, a high node count or a large community is not enough. Projects must also listen to their users, who can spot points of friction or recommend features that work well on other networks. The truth is, the market – or user behavior – can tell a project everything it needs to know.

A reputation for transparency

There is nothing more harmful to a cryptocurrency than a bad reputation. Many projects doom themselves by dwelling in the shadows, where it’s impossible to earn user or investor trust. There have also been several cases of projects using whitepapers copied from other projects without changing anything but the organization and token name. Although some investors will fall for a bogus whitepaper, it is usually a recipe for disaster.

Investors also tend to avoid tokens that have a history of security breaches or protocol issues. Though this isn’t to say that a project can’t survive a hack. In fact, if a project shows that it overcame a security issue and bounced back stronger, it will reflect positively on the long-term vision of the project and the quality of the team behind it.

In summary, to raise the value and market cap of a cryptoasset, one should disclose everything about the project (owners’ backgrounds, roadmap, future plans, risks, etc.) and be as transparent as possible.

Marketing

In recent years, the marketing of cryptoasset projects has become increasingly important. Competition forces projects to continuously improve their marketing communications and adopt different channels to discover new audience members.

Marketing doesn’t stop once a project goes live or gets listed on an exchange. If a project has a unique use case, there’s a chance that word will spread organically. However, in most cases, projects should spend at least some money on marketing and PR.

To determine the maximum cryptocurrency market cap, we need max values for price and circulating supply.

Generally speaking, the price of a cryptocurrency is determined by supply and demand. Unfortunately, demand is almost impossible to predict. For example, in the case of Bitcoin (Bitcoin), we can’t be sure at what price it will trade when it reaches its maximum supply of 21 million. It could be $50,000 or $500,000. Depending on outside factors, such as a ban on cryptocurrencies, it may even drop below its current price.

Estimating the maximum circulating supply of all cryptocurrencies can also be difficult. While some protocols declare a fixed supply, others are designed to continuously issue new tokens. Due to these unpredictable dynamics and the fact that new cryptocurrencies are developed daily, it becomes quite hard to predict how much cryptocurrency will be in circulation at any point in the future.

That said, to determine the maximum cryptocurrency market cap, one would have to find the maximum circulating supply of all available cryptocurrencies then multiply that by the prices of those currencies when their respective circulating supplies are at their maximums.

Let’s see what some of the field’s leading figures say. Changpeng Zhao (CZ), the founder of Binance, admitted that he sees cryptocurrencies growing 1000x more and surpassing a market cap of \$200 trillion. Vitalik Buterin, co-founder of Ethereum (ETH), stated that he sees room for growth, but added that it’s unlikely the cryptocurrency market reaches such levels. Who’s right?

Although we can’t know for sure, we can make some assumptions based on present information and expert projections. If the crypto market cap reaches \$200 trillion, it will mean that cryptocurrencies represent the majority of the world’s wealth. For this to occur, the world financial system would have to undergo a paradigmatic shift. Banks and high-net-worth individuals would have to drop current investments and stores of value in favor of cryptocurrencies. For now, this seems unlikely.

A survey by the World Economic Forum concluded that in 2027, 10% of the world’s GDP will be held in digital assets. According to statistics from the World Bank , global GDP was approximately $85.8 trillion in 2018. Long-term GDP forecasts project a 2027 GDP of $126 trillion. If the above estimates are correct, in 2027, $12.6 trillion of the world’s GDP will be stored in cryptoassets. These figures are far from CZ’s $200 trillion.

Let’s look at it another way. If the price per Bitcoin reaches $50,000 when the maximum supply is mined, its market cap will surpass $1 trillion. Considering that Bitcoin accounts for more than 60% of the crypto market cap, it means that the entire market will only be worth about \$2 trillion.

To get a broader perspective, let’s take a look at the world’s money supply and the way it is diversified. In 2017, the planet’s narrow money (coins, banknotes, and checking accounts) was worth about $36.8 trillion. According to data from the World Bank, the 2018 market capitalization for all listed domestic companies was $68.6 trillion. This means that explosive growth will be required for the market cap of cryptocurrencies to rival the market cap of checking accounts or stocks.

In theory, the only check on the cryptocurrency market cap is the world’s money supply. However, at least in the near-term, it’s unlikely the crypto market cap exceeds even a few trillion dollars.

Market capitalization is a popular indicator, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. Ranking cryptocurrencies solely by market cap ignores crucial statistical information and fails to inform investors about popularity, liquidity, and other important factors. Investors who base their decisions exclusively on market cap often end up disappointed.

Investors would be better off analyzing the time needed for a cryptoasset to trade its market cap equivalent. The rule of thumb is that if a cryptocurrency generates trading volume that is equal to or higher than its market cap, it is healthy and stable. Investors can get in and out of positions quickly and lock in trades at preferred prices.

Monthly trading volume for some of the more popular cryptocurrencies is similar to their respective market caps. This indicates stability and balanced interest from market participants. But if we look at Bytecoin (BCN), we find a major gap between transparent trading volume and market cap. As of this writing, it would take 212 months for Bytecoin’s monthly trading volume to reach its market cap. In the case of IOTA (IOT), it would take approximately 7 months. For Bitcoin (BTC) and Ethereum (ETH), it would only take 2.5 and 1.5 months respectively.

How might a coin with low trading volume get a high market cap? It often occurs when a cryptocurrency’s supply is high, but there aren’t many coins in circulation. This could be due to long-term HODLers who aren’t actively buying and selling.

A disadvantage of investing in low-volume cryptoassets is their inability to support big trades. A single trade could move a low-volume cryptocurrency significantly. This makes such assets unattractive to large investors who would struggle to execute major trades without experiencing slippage.